THM

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Today’s post will be focusing on what we can do to worry just a bit less. This post is completely for personal development because lately I’ve been suffering from quite a lot of anxiety - about life, work, relationships, me, myself, and I. (Now I wonder how things will be once I’m officially tied with someone else, don’t even mention about the kids that will come out eventually…… )

1. Think about the absolute worst that can happen with the particular situation. Ending a relationship, quitting your job/getting fired, screwing up a project a work, etc. is not the end of the world. As long as there are no deaths or dramatic health problems, you (or me) will be FINE because we can try these things again. 

2. Do not try to guess what’s on someone else’s mind. Just don’t project your fears onto someone else. Instead, focus on communication and just ask the person. They should have reasons why they do not want to share certain things with you. But if you never show them that you care about the situation - who would know? 

3. Live in the present and cease the day! This one in particular is difficult for me because my mind is always way ahead of the present. I always want things to work out and think about how I want it to work out in the long-run. Consequently, anything that deviates from my plan would be extremely frustrating and ruin my day. So I’m trying by taking things just a bit slower by smelling (or rather, looking at) flowers, eating food, and strolling around when the sun decides to come out. 

4. Exercise - Last month, I purchased the two year 24 hour fitness membership from Costco and have been consistently going to the gym at least 3 times a week. I realized that going on the elliptical/treadmill does not work for me  so I started attending Zumba, Yoga, Body Pump, Body Fitness group workout classes and they have been amazing. Sweating helps because your body is happy. When your body is happy it cooperates with you more and doesn’t get sick or fatigued easily- who wouldn’t 

appreciate this? 

Like my coworker also pointed out, comparing with other people is good to a certain extent, but your worst critic is yourself. So when upset, why not compare yourself today with yourself yesterday and see how much you’ve grown since yesterday? 

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I’m back! After a year of absence, a dear friend reminded me of this blog and how it might be a fun project to pick up.
This year, instead of only pictures of outfits and food, I would like to share some personal thoughts on life as a twenty-some year old. These few years are likely to be the most “dramatic” years as we fully integrate ourselves into society. Did you know that 80% of life’s most defining moments take place by 35? 66.67% of lifetime wage growth takes place in the first 10 years of our career? And our personalities change the most during our twnties than at any time before or after?
I have been working for almost 5 months, 2 were spent abroad, and 3 were here. I still do not quite feel settled-in yet, but am slowly picking up routines, friends, and life back in the Bay. Llife as a young working professional and a ride on a roller coaster are very comparable. There are days when I felt invinicible and everything was perfect - my manager praises me, the guy I like gives me the right attention, friends ask me to hang out, etc. Then comes the other days when everything fell apart and nothing just felt right. Nothing was right because I didn’t have control and there was uncertainty - we don’t like uncertainty, but we need uncertainty.
Uncertainty makes us appreciate moments when certainty is achieved. Certainty gives us instant gratification but having certainty is just, lets put it, boring. For example, when we know that we’re certainly good at something, it becomes more difficult for us to become better. When we know our person of interest likes us back, we know that he/she is always there for us and no longer have to chase him/her. Certainty makes us comfortable, whereas uncertainly sometimes can act as driving forces behind our goals and get us to where we think we want to be / need to be. Based on this implication, uncertainty is almost better for us because it fuels our growth. But we then start whining and doubting our capabilities, and freak out when things are out of our control/expectations.
I’m not sure if we can even say which is “better,” but that the two will have to coexist. What I do know is that as we experience more of life, we learn from our previous mistakes/decisions and learn to cope with uncertainty better. If you need to complain to your friends or cry, then do it. Trust me, once in a while dose of catharsis really works. Just remember to not rub your eyes while crying or else you’ll wake up with puffy eyes the next day!
Photo credit: me Location: Contraband Coffee | Nob Hill SF

I’m back! After a year of absence, a dear friend reminded me of this blog and how it might be a fun project to pick up.

This year, instead of only pictures of outfits and food, I would like to share some personal thoughts on life as a twenty-some year old. These few years are likely to be the most “dramatic” years as we fully integrate ourselves into society. Did you know that 80% of life’s most defining moments take place by 35? 66.67% of lifetime wage growth takes place in the first 10 years of our career? And our personalities change the most during our twnties than at any time before or after?

I have been working for almost 5 months, 2 were spent abroad, and 3 were here. I still do not quite feel settled-in yet, but am slowly picking up routines, friends, and life back in the Bay. Llife as a young working professional and a ride on a roller coaster are very comparable. There are days when I felt invinicible and everything was perfect - my manager praises me, the guy I like gives me the right attention, friends ask me to hang out, etc. Then comes the other days when everything fell apart and nothing just felt right. Nothing was right because I didn’t have control and there was uncertainty - we don’t like uncertainty, but we need uncertainty.

Uncertainty makes us appreciate moments when certainty is achieved. Certainty gives us instant gratification but having certainty is just, lets put it, boring. For example, when we know that we’re certainly good at something, it becomes more difficult for us to become better. When we know our person of interest likes us back, we know that he/she is always there for us and no longer have to chase him/her. Certainty makes us comfortable, whereas uncertainly sometimes can act as driving forces behind our goals and get us to where we think we want to be / need to be. Based on this implication, uncertainty is almost better for us because it fuels our growth. But we then start whining and doubting our capabilities, and freak out when things are out of our control/expectations.

I’m not sure if we can even say which is “better,” but that the two will have to coexist. What I do know is that as we experience more of life, we learn from our previous mistakes/decisions and learn to cope with uncertainty better. If you need to complain to your friends or cry, then do it. Trust me, once in a while dose of catharsis really works. Just remember to not rub your eyes while crying or else you’ll wake up with puffy eyes the next day!

Photo credit: me
Location: Contraband Coffee | Nob Hill SF

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My home

My home

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Notre dame cathedral in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam.

Notre dame cathedral in Ho Chi Minh city, Vietnam.

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In love with this city.

In love with this city.

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Study abroad. Do it.

Study abroad. Do it.

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Spend some time with nature.

Spend some time with nature.

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